Posts tagged Basic Attack
Forging #1
 
Cards like ‘Scotch’ have a gap showing that there is space for another card to fit in, this lets players know that it is forge-able. If you look at ‘Insane Combo’, you can see a fully forged card.

Cards like ‘Scotch’ have a gap showing that there is space for another card to fit in, this lets players know that it is forge-able. If you look at ‘Insane Combo’, you can see a fully forged card.

 

To begin this topic, I’ll discuss what ‘forging’ is in Sigils of Kairos.  In short, there are cards that can be upgraded by merging them with a similar card.  The simplest example would be when a basic attack card. When one basic attack card dragged onto another, they are replaced with a single card that does more damage. Each individual character also has a special move that can be forged with duplicate itself to create a more powerful version. These character-specific cards can’t be mixed and matched with other types of cards.

When we came up with the idea of forging cards together, it felt like a very natural extension of our core game idea.  Originally conceived as a ‘combo’ attack, the forge mechanic served to fix some fundamental issues with the game and add to the meaningful decisions for players.  Where we are currently in development, it is difficult to even imagine Sigils of Kairos without the forging mechanic as it is so integral to our game.

As briefly discussed, there were some projected issues with hand sizes early on.  Throughout the game, the player is dealt a hand with cards from all of the characters in the party.  Since the player can only play cards that belong the active character, their hand would get gummed up until they risked putting a more fragile character out front.  Although a risk-reward dynamic adds to the game, we also wanted players to hold cards for specific openings as opposed to playing cards for the sake of getting them out of their hands.  Though this hand crowding is bound to happen, we wanted to minimize it and make sure decisions are both distinctive and impactful.

By merging cards together, players are given more space for new cards to come in and amplify the card effects already in their hands.  This doesn’t just allow cards to be held for specific openings, but highly encourages it. This leads directly into the next and more important outcome of the forge mechanic, decision making.

Please drop by in a couple weeks and I will dive into some of the decisions that stem from this mechanic.

~ Cedrick